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Junelyn Little

Weather station data to cell phone

DyaconLive Growers Report

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DyaconLive provides our customers with an easy to use website for staying up to date with current weather conditions and makes it easy to download historical station data. However, we know that for many applications weather data is just the first component of more in depth analysis. Indeed, the key value provided by a station may not necessarily be the raw measurements, but rather the derived quantities that can provide actionable information. The question a business owner faces might not be “What is the temperature?” but rather “What is the trend in average temperature?”.

At Dyacon, we strive to facilitate this need for actionable insights. As part of this effort, we are introducing DyaconLive Reports. These are application-specific reports that are downloaded from DyaconLive and provide sophisticated data analysis in a user friendly interface.

One of the reports now available on DyaconLive is a “Grower’s Report”. This report is specifically targeted at agricultural producers and helps monitor crop growth by calculating Growing Degree Days (GDD) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Growing_degree-day). GDDs are calculated from air temperature measurements above (or sometimes below) a certain threshold.

Mathematically:

This equation is often simplified by using daily max/min values. Temperature is an important factor in plant and insect growth, so GDDs provide a means of evaluating when a particular crop or insect will reach maturity. This helps grower’s anticipate problems and plan for harvest.

The figure below shows a typical Grower’s Report for one of Dyacon’s test stations in Logan, Utah. The key components of the report, common in many different reports, are highlighted yellow. Near the top is an overview of station metadata and the dates associated with the output. A data quality assessment table is displayed next to the station table, and this is arguably one of the most important components of any report. Without good quality input data, the report output is meaningless. Input data quality is assessed automatically by the DyaconLive server when the report is generated. Measurements are assessed for reasonableness in terms of data values, behavior, and in some cases consistency with other measurements. The details behind these algorithms will be discussed further in a future blog.

 

 

The main output of the report consists of a summary table detailing settings and totals, and interactive charts for visualizing report output. The Grower’s Report charts temperature over the report timeframe and shows where the GDD threshold is located relative the temperature measurements. The GDD chart shows accumulated GDD and how it is changing through time. Users can assess current GDD values to determine how their crop is maturing.

Weather Station Requirements

  • Temperature
  • DyaconLive connection

Compatible Dyacon Weather Stations: MS-120, MS-130, MS-135, MS-140, MS-150

The only measurement required for this report is air temperature, which should be present on all Dyacon meteorological stations. It is worth noting that other reports will require a wider variety of instruments not present on every station.

How To Generate Your Report

Report generation currently requires Manager or Admin level access to DyaconLive.

  • Log in and navigate to the “Reports” section of the Data Page for your station.
  • Select a start date, temperature threshold, and temperature units.
  • Select ‘Generate Report’ and the report will be displayed in the browser.

Chris Cox

Burning Man Weather Station

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Building a functional, temporary city in the desert every year is a remarkable challenge. The Burning Man organization does a remarkable job of pulling off one of the biggest and most challenging events in the world. Throw in a temporary airstrip (88NV) with thousands of aircraft flights and you now have a unique challenge that most event organizers don’t have to face.

Ben, a staff member and pilot explained:

I don’t know [the number of flights] off the top of my head. If I recall correctly it is in the low thousands of ops. Like 2000-3000 over the course of the week that it is open.

Just to give you an idea of what it is like, I made 27 ops last year myself there are about 10 pilots who fly people around like I do. The ultralight guys do close to a hundred each. Then we have the charter ops, I have no idea how many of those there are but it is lots, and parachute operations and medivac… We had something like 160 planes on the field for the people who flew their own planes in.

It is pretty impressive, we spend most of the year planning and then put it all together in a week use it for a week and then tear it apart in a few days.

To the air boss, local and remotely accessible weather data is an important component.

Dyacon weather stations provide surface weather data through a cable connection to a local PC while also sending data to DyaconLive and Weather Underground. Additionally, text messaging is used for weather reports, remote debugging, and configuration.

Burning Man first deployed a Dyacon station in 2017.

These stations are erected every year by their aviation staff and stored until the next year.

After sitting idle for the year, the 2017 station required a firmware update when it was deployed. This was easily done over-the-air, no programming tools, cables, or software utilities required, just a simple text message command.

 

The Burning Man staff do a remarkable job. We are proud to be a part of their dusty venture. (And we are glad that they now have two Dyacon stations serving their needs in 2018, one with cell phone and one on WiFi.)

Eugene

Ethiopian Weather Station

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Getting a sophisticated weather station deployed in remote areas can be a challenge. Equipment that requires custom programming and setup by outside engineers adds to the overall system cost. Maintenance by similar outside resources means that systems may be down for extended periods of time until funds can be allocated and engineers scheduled.

We recently provided a weather for a Small-scale & Micro Irrigation Support (SMIS) Project in Ethiopia. We shipped the equipment, manuals, and a USB drive and DVD with our YouTube videos. The users did the rest.

The following are some pictures that tell the story better than I.

We strive to build the most practical industrial weather stations on the market. This is a good example of the usability.

Eugene

DyaconLive Part 2

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Read part 1 here. Updates are being made to as quickly as we can get them out.

Update: 10 July 2018

The work goes on to make DyaconLive more and more useful. Two table options were added to DyaconLive with the July release, a daily summary table and an aviation advisory table. One of these will be enabled on your login depending on the function of the weather station.

DyaconLive Panes

Last Observation is now give as an age rather than a date. This makes it more intuitive for users to see how old the data is.

We have also rearranged the dashboard to make room for the new table and improve readability. The new dashboard looks beautiful.

DyaconLive Weather Station Dashboard

 

Update: 29 June 2018

One of the features we have added to DyaconLive is the option to set alarms based on instrument conditions.

DyaconLive Alarms

Users can not only set the value, but can also specify instructions and a specific email recipient.

Are there any conditions for which you would like to receive alerts? Dewpoint, heat index, cloud base? Let us know.

Update: 29 March 2018

Chris and Eric released a new version of DyaconLive. The coolest part is the weather station status page that charts the battery voltage, solar panel voltage, and charger state. This gives users an excellent tool to evaluate battery condition. (You have to be the station admin user to see this, it doesn’t show up on the public link.) Read More

Stay Up to Date With Us

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There are a variety of ways you can stay up to date with the staff here at Dyacon. Our social media will direct you to new blog posts and ideas, and our quarterly newsletter is an email sent out once per quarter informing you of significant Dyacon updates.

Quarterly Newsletter:





 

 

 




AGU Fall Meeting 2017

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December 11-15th 2017, Dyacon will be exhibiting with over 300 other companies at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting. The meeting will be held at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Stop by Booth #644 to meet Eugene Bodrero, the owner of Dyacon.

Check the AGU website for more information and to register to attend.

Winston Drag Racing 1994

Dyacon Weather Stations For Drag Racing

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In racing, there are two reasons for collecting weather data.

  • Engine performance analysis – Density altitude (DA)
  • Public safety – Lightning detection and heat index

Weather and drag racing

Density altitude is used to describe the density of the air using temperature, barometric pressure, and relative humidity. In a hot and humid location, the density altitude may be much higher than the actual altitude. Why does it matter? When the density altitude is higher than the actual altitude, engine performance may be decreased. Inversely, when DA is lower there is more oxygen available resulting in faster cars and better ET’s.

An on-site weather station can provide wind speed and wind direction measurements. These are important considerations for vehicle control during front-wheel lift and chute deployment. Wind conditions may also have an affect on ET. Read More

American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

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American Meteorological Society annual meeting 2017

Dyacon is pleased to announce attendance at the American Meteorological Society‘s 97th annual meeting as an exhibitor.

 

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) is the nation’s leading professional scientific organization, with over 13,000 members. Members come from many different professions including weather enthusiasts, educators,  researchers, scientists, broadcast meteorologists, students, and other professionals in meteorological fields.

The annual meeting will be held in Seattle, Washington from Monday, January 23rd through Thursday, January 26th. Our booth number is 718 in the main hall. Stop by to talk with Eugene and get face-to-face consultation. We hope to see you there!

Exhibit Hours:

Mon, 23 January 4:00–7:30 p.m. (Intn’l Walk-Around 4–5:30 p.m.; Ribbon Cutting at 5:30 p.m.)
Tues, 24 January 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Wed, 25 January 9:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m.
Thurs, 26 January 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Exhibitor list  |  Additional Information

 

Update 2/17/17

Industrial Weather Stations

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DSC_0858While sports may be a good conversation starter, weather is universal and has no fan loyalties to offend. Like politics, all weather is local. No matter where we live, there is  always some type of extreme condition that we can brag or complain about. Lying behind our claims to climatic woes are rather unobtrusive, and may I say, unglamorous instruments. Aside from elevating your prestige among neighbors, weather stations rarely garner much attention.

Weather stations, meteorological (met) stations, automated surface observing systems (ASOS/AWOS), and remote automatic weather stations (RAWS) among other names are used to describe the weather equipment that ranges in price from a few dollars to government grant territory. While a grocery store weather station may be suitable to tell you whether to wear a coat in the morning, it is usually insufficient
for serious data collection for industrial users. On the other end of the spectrum, high-end systems are far beyond the abilities of the average industrial technician or wire-twister to install and operate. High-end systems are based on programmable data loggers that require an engineer to integrate the sensors and a developer to write a custom program to read the sensors, store the data, and relay it to servers where it can be downloaded, analyzed and viewed.

Industrial Applications

Industrial safety requires a wide range of parameters to measure local weather conditions. Depending on the hazards, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and humidity may be critical values. Such parameters are typically available on nearly every weather station, however, heat values and instruments such as globe thermometer, WBGT, heat index, humidex, and lightning detection may be parameters only available on mid-range or high-end systems.

Environmental monitoring at construction, mine, material storage, waste management, and other industrial sites may use industrial weather instruments for dust or odor mitigation, supporting reclamation, validating or assessing regulatory compliance, and monitoring conditions such as evaporation rates, soil saturation, and wind gust effects.

Considerations

Cost

Unlike government-funded entities, industrial users must be sensitive to equipment purchase, installation, and maintenance costs. While a nod from the neighbor may justify the instrument screwed to your back fence at home, commercial and industrial users are looking for actionable data at a reasonable cost.

Some cost-related questions:

Can existing staff support the installation and maintenance of the weather station?

Does the purchase and installation require working with an exclusive dealer? What is the cost for ongoing dealer support and how do they schedule service calls?

Are operating manuals available?

Is system configuration software free or is the purchase of a software license required?

Is a subscription required to access the weather station data?

Are software updates to the weather station free?

Features

Sensor operation can be an overlooked detail. The basic question is: Can the sensor capture the data of interest?

Wind gust is one parameter that can be difficult to capture. Some equipment merely provides current or maximum values. This value may be sampled at an interval that does not allow for reliable gust detection or standard averaging techniques. Similarly, wind direction sensors may suffer from a dead-zone of three to five degrees. Manufacturers usually call this “north”, requiring the user to orient the whole system rather than merely setting the north position after installation.

Equipment configuration should be simple and flexible. Special interface dongles, costly software, or complex programming languages are typically not desirable. A system that can be configured through both wired and wireless connections offers substantial service flexibility. Some applications may require connecting the weather station to automation controllers (PLCs) or SCADA systems. Interface ports, such as Modbus (explained in this post), allow for a direct connection using standard industrial hardware.

A display, such as an LCD, on the instrument can be very valuable. A local LCD allows for operators to troubleshoot, configure, and maintain the system easily. This saves support cost and reduces configuration errors.

Data

For an industrial weather station to be worth the money put in, it needs to have wired and wireless features to deliver useful data when and where it is needed. Wireless data can be in the form of WiFi, cell phone, ISM-band radio, or satellite all having their own advantages and disadvantages. Stations with embedded cell phones may provide wireless data features as well as reports and configuration through SMS text messages compatible with any phone.

Data accessibility should be a paramount consideration. If you can’t make sense of the data of interest, the system is useless. This may come in the form of charting historical values, condition reports on your cell phone, or a web portal. Software such as Weather View 32* and Weather Underground* are often used as means to review weather data. Our site of choice, Weather Underground, is a free web portal that beautifully charts instrument data and can be accessed by multiple users without any cost.

Summary

Industrial weather stations are a step up in performance and features from the department store variety. While they may be more costly than consumer goods, you do not need to jeopardize your next performance evaluation.

Hopefully this information will help you look beyond the wrapper and find a weather station solution that provides the versatility and flexibility that you need at a practical cost.

* Weather Underground® is a trade mark of The Weather Company, an IBM company.
Weather View 32 is a trade mark of Weather Information Systems.

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